A report published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine had revealed that common over the counter remedies available to enhance men’s sexual health may not be as effective as claimed- or even safe for that matter.

The report comes at a very important time; since as much as 40-70% of men experience symptoms of erectile or sexual dysfunction at some point of their lives, and turn to over the counter products for shame of visiting a physician to have their issue addressed.

Coupled with the fact that the supplement industry is booming- over 200% growth from the period 1999-2007, and the array of available products, it’s not surprising that both consumers and health practitioners alike are confused with what to choose.

The researchers came from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center[i] in Winston-Salem, NC with the goal of providing a reference of sorts to physicians and urologists who need a guide[ii] for counseling patients that take such products, when presented to them.

Illegal Products Hidden In Plain Sight

Owing to the fact that supplements are rarely or very loosely regulated by the FDA, it was not surprising when the researchers revealed that there was no significant scientific evidence to suggest that various products had any measurable impact on libido, performance or erectile potency.

In fact, many of the so-called natural products were found to be laced with small traces of prescription PDE inhibitors, the class of drugs Viagra belongs to.

PDE inhibitors cannot be legally purchased without a physician’s prescription, since they carry significant risk of harm if used in individuals with certain pre-existing conditions, such as heart disease, liver and kidney disease, or using certain other prescription medications.

Over 81% of the products purchased and tested in the USA contained traces of these prescription only PDE Inhibitors, demonstrating the possible risk to the buying public.

Out of the many popular ingredients analyzed, only L-Arginine showed modest potential for improving erectile function, but could also dangerously lower blood pressure if not used wisely.

[i] http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-01/wfbm-mto011116.php

[ii] http://www.jsm.jsexmed.org/article/S1743-6095(15)34439-8/fulltext